zebrafish optogenetics
Stress might seem like a bad word, but it does have its perks. A recent study by Rodrigo J. De Marco uncovered the role of the pituitary in zebrafish larvae behavior after the onset of stress.
Optogenetics has been invaluable in many brain studies, chemogenetics has been a good non-invasive alternative. Magnetogenetics is the new kid on the block. Can it do better?
neuroscience 2015 chicago zebrafish booth
Neuroscience 2015. Meeting all those scientists, getting to ask them all about their research…there is a lot to take in. Here are some examples from today.
neuroscience 2015 chicago
Time for some running action at Neuroscience 2015. And we had a satellite symposium!
eating behavior mice
Craving a snack, the joy of eating it. The part of our brain that regulates this is the lateral hypothalamus. An interesting targer for addiction and eating disorder research.
Rat in open field
In this post I am looking back at our most popular posts (based on numbers of views) on video tracking. Zebrafish, optogenetics, and Parkinson’s disease are topics that dominate the list, which honestly is no surprise to me.
Zebrafish tracking
By this point, we do not need to tell you how popular zebrafish are. We also probably do not need to point out the great technological advances that are being made in research because of the use of optogenetics.
Mice playing in tube
A great example of optogenetics in behavioral studies is the work of Dr. Kravitz and Dr. Kreitzer at the Kreitzer lab (currently, Kravitz works at the NIDDK in Bethesda). Let me tell you about it.
Mouse on gloved hand
Brains are complicated. We all know that. Like an entangled bunch of wires. Still, over the years, neuroscientists have been able to map out several brain regions and their functions in behavior and physiology.