Infant eye gaze
Researcher Rebecca Knapp was interested to know whether infant eye gaze away from the mother, or eye gaze directed to the mother, would correspond to increased maternal oxytocin. Read her blog post to learn more.
Playing child
Parent-child interaction is an important focus of child development research. Lee’s research team compared recordings of play behavior from both a traditional third-person point of view, and through the babies' eyes.
Skin-to-skin contact
Skin-to-skin contact is essential in developing a feeling of safety, and in creating the bond between parent and child, especially with premature babies. Buil et al. compared two different kangaroo positioning techniques.
Observe eating behavior
Edelson and her colleagues from the Nestlé Research Center in Sweden studied parent-child interactions during meal time using in-home studies.
Understanding adolescent emotions
How are adolescents’ emotions socialized by mothers and close friends? A recent study focuses on dealing with depression in adolescence.
Mother-child interaction
Autism is a developmental disability that remains with a person for his or her whole life. The World Autism Awareness Day tries to bring awareness to this growing health concern.
Learning from direct experiences
Although children can learn a great deal on their own, conversations with parents have a big influence on the content, recall and transfer of what they learn.
Encourage to eat healthy food
With the observed increase in pediatric obesity in recent years, a child’s family, particularly his parents, may influence eating behavior, diet, and physical activity through their parenting and food choices.
Information gap makes children guess
How do siblings describe the disorder of another sibling? By gaining more insight into this process, parents and counselors should be able to learn more about this information gap and the ways known to bridge it.
Three things we take with us from 2014
As the year comes to a close, the results are crystal clear. We have rounded up the top three most viewed blog posts of 2014 in psychology, neuromarketing, and autism research. Interested? Read on!
Rett syndrome
In the study about Rett syndrome discussed in this blog post, the researchers indicated that normal cooing and babbling were absent in the first two years of life.