Observational research examples with older persons
In certain cases, observations for your study are best performed on-site. In this blog, we describe examples of observational studies with older age groups, conducted at home or at a healthcare facility.
Behavior and emotions of older adults
Can TV footage motivate older persons to start being more active? Being active can improve the overall health of a person (65+ but of course also 65-!).
Adolescent mother
Adolescent mothers are tackling their transition to adulthood and the transition to parenthood. This is called the double risk for mother and infant, inherent in adolescent motherhood.
Father child
Fatherhood is a topic of high social relevance that attracts much public interest and therefore also the attention of scientists.
the creative brain
How can you come to better understand what is going on in the creative process? A living lab studying the work of a writer, painter, musician or other creative person might provide the answer.
It is inevitable that everyone will experience anxiety and stress at some point in their lives. Most individuals are able to move past their stress with just a little bit of effort.
Asian boy in the grass
Automated video tracking is a valuable tool for studies on animal models of autism (ASD). Diagnosis of ASD is based on behavior alone in humans, so naturally, behavior is an important part of human as well as rodent studies.
It may sound very simple, but recording video and playing it back enables more detailed analysis of facial expressions.
There are many reasons to study the development of hand preference in infants. For one thing, being left-handed can be an advantage in one-on-one sports such as tennis.
Observational research is becoming more and more popular in consumer science and market research. From on-site behavioral observations in supermarkets to advanced multimodal lab studies.
Parent-child interaction in autism: play behavior
According to a recent study conducted by Freeman and Kasari of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, the importance of play and engagement in young children with autism is rooted in parental strategies.