Using humor during doctor-patient interactions
How often do medical professionals use humor during the interaction with patients? After all, such positive interactions help build a relationship, establish trust, and support the exchange of relevant information.
Information gap makes children guess
How do siblings describe the disorder of another sibling? By gaining more insight into this process, parents and counselors should be able to learn more about this information gap and the ways known to bridge it.
Aggresive behavior in mice
Aggressive behavior is adaptive for most species. But how is this aggressive behavior mediated in the brain? A recent study indicates that the hippocampus is a crucial neural component in mediating social recognition.
Movement analysis in volleyball
Researchers from Aix-Marseille Université and the University of Groningen analyzed match plays to gain insight into the whole-body and arm movements.
Alcohol makes men smile
Detailed Action Unit analysis provided insight in how many times people smiled and if a single smile developed into a mutual smile.
What do calves choose to eat
Guest blogger Laura Webb wrote about her research on dietary preferences in calves.
Bonobos (Pan paniscus)
In Planckendael Wild Animal Park (Belgium), researchers have been observing a group of bonobos and have found that the differences between chimpanzees and bonobos are not always as black and white as generally believed.
Does the sex of a simulated patient affect CPR?
When faced with either a male or female patient simulator, both men and women rescuers appeared reluctant to remove a female patient simulator’s clothing.
Which head and neck positions are stressful for your horse?
Being a horse owner and a Noldus employee is the perfect combination when it comes to keeping track of the scientific background for my horseback riding hobby.
Behavior and emotions of older adults
Can TV footage motivate elderly to start being more active? Being active can improve the overall health of a person (65+ but of course also 65-!).
Why non-verbal behavior matters
Basil Preisig and his colleagues at the University of Bern, Switzerland, were especially interested in communicative development of people diagnosed with language disorders like aphasia.