Webinar

Technical briefing: Detection Settings in EthoVision XT: Insights Into Doing it Right


In this webinar, we’ll go over all the things that you need to consider before starting your experiment.

Registration is free, but don't wait, because we only have 500 seats available.

Date | 22 October 2020

Time | 4pm CEST (Amsterdam) & 4pm EDT (Washington, DC)

 

 

ethovision mouse behavior recognition behavior list
 


Abstract

Considered to be the “heart and soul” of EthoVision XT, the Detection Settings are an extremely important component of the software that can make or break your research.  Without good tracking, there are no good data.  However, if your experimental settings are done correctly, the Detection Settings can be very easy to set-up and will allow you to be more confident in your data.  In this webinar, we’ll go over all the things that you need to consider before starting your experiment.  From contrast and different types of lighting conditions to tricks that can make tracking multiple subjects or multiple body points ideal, we’ll cover it all!

 


About the presenter

A native Mississippian, Matt received his doctorate from the University of Mississippi in Experimental Psychology/Behavioral Neuroscience with a focus on anxiety, depression, and pain.  He then moved out of the “Deep South” to Charleston, SC to start a 3 year postdoc at MUSC examining the neurobiology and sex differences in psychostimulant addiction and relapse, afterwards moving into a 5 year research faculty position.  Having decided it was time to take his behavior research experiences outside academia, Matt joined Noldus in 2012 as an Account Manager and Field Application Specialist. Since that time, Matt has traveled extensively throughout North America, logging over 1200 days of on-site travel for trainings, and countless hours of remote trainings and technical support.  Outside of Noldus, Matt enjoys running, cycling, beer brewing, fermenting pretty much anything, and spending as much time as possible with his wife, Kate, and 7-month-old son “Little Man” Jack.

Matt Feltenstein
 

Details

22nd October 2020
Virtual meeting