How to build a consumer behavior research lab?

How to build a consumer behavior research lab?

Posted by Annelies Querner-Verkerk on Mon 25 Feb. 2013 - 1 minute read

In order to get off to a good start, it is best to describe the research or tests that are going to be performed in detail. With this description it becomes clear what kind of equipment will be needed, and which physical environment (on-site or in a lab) would best suit this test or research.

In general, the description should answer the following questions:

  • Do consumer goods, products, food items need to be tested?
  • Do participants need to walk around in the lab?
  • How many people are present during a test, besides the participant(s)?
  • Are participants being invited to visit a lab and/or is on-site research going to be performed? 
  • What kind of participants need to be selected (age, gender, etc.)?  
  • How big are the rooms? And, does the building have special aspects (i.e. is it a monument)? You can also build a lab in an existing restaurant or cafeteria making it into a ‘living lab’.

Would you like to learn more?

Download this free ‘how to’ guide for more information. In this free 'How to' guide you can find a list of equipment you can think about when building a consumer behavior lab. Of course, the exact combination of tools used in a lab depends on specific requirements and wishes.









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Scientific articles

Are you interested in reading more about actual research applications,please view the list below. This list is a small selection of scientific publications in this area.

  • Forde, C.G.; Kuijk, N. van; Thaler, T.; Graaf, C. de; Martin, N. (2012). Oral processing characteristics of solid savoury meal components, and relationship with food composition, sensory attributes and expected satiation. Appetite, 60, 208-219.
  • Wilfinger, D.; Weiss, A.; Tscheligi, M. (2009). Exploring shopping information and navigation strategies with a mobile device. Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services (Bonn, Germany, 15-18 September 2009).
  • Zeinstra, G.G.; Koelen, M.A., Colindres, D.; Kok, F.J.; Graag, C. de (2009). Facial expressions in school-aged children are a good indicator of 'dislikes', but not of 'likes'. Food Quality and Preference, 20, pp.620-624.

More information

Really knowing your customer is very important. Learn more about the tools and solutions offered by Noldus in consumer behavior research, sensory science, and marketing research.

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