how-to-collect-data-in-an-observation-lab

How to collect high quality data in an observation lab

Posted by Annelies Querner-Verkerk on Mon 03 Oct. 2011

Observational research is often best carried out in a stationary lab. Controlled conditions and accurate data recording are key in scientific success and a stationary lab provides these controlled conditions while allowing scientists to observe test participants unobtrusively.

It is possible to combine video observations, physiological data collection, facial expression analysis, sensory testing, and more in a lab, and thus a myriad of different experiment setups and designs based on the type and position of cameras, microphones, eye trackers webcams: whatever is necessary to gather rich and meaningful data (see the inter-observer agreement percentages below).

A Noldus Observation Lab


Observation Lab mother child

1) Investigating the organization of spontaneous eye blinks

In a recent study Mei-Hua Lee et al. (2010) investigate the mean rate and time-dependent sequential organization of spontaneous eye blinks in adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. They also explore the behavior of individuals from this group who are additionally categorized with stereotypic movement disorder.

So how did they set up their behavior experiment? They positioned one camera in a clinical exam room. Researchers then asked test participants to sit in a chair and look directly into the camera. This observation room was created to record natural, spontaneous eye-blink behavior while free of external noise and interruption.

Two observers coded the recordings and reached an average of 93.2% inter-observer agreement.

2) Exploring the relationships between sensory perception and facial reactions

Wendin et al. (2011) recorded behavior using a dome camera. Participants were asked to taste several samples served in plastic cups. The dome camera was located in the ceiling approximately 3 meters from the test participant, and after the experiment two trained observers coded facial expressions.

The aim of this study was to explore relationships between sensory perception and facial reactions. The observers rated the facial reactions such as frown, eye widening, and lips pursed independently with inter-observer agreement exceeding 90%.

In the end they conclude that a combination of sensory and facial expression analysis successfully added insight into the perception of basic tastes.









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References

  • Lee, M.; Bodfish, J.W.; Lewis, M.H.; Newell, K.M (2010). Low dimensional temporal organization of spontaneous eye blinks in adults with developmental disabilities and stereotyped movement disorder. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 31, 250-255.
  • Wendin, K.; Allesen-Holm, B.H.;  Bredie, W.L.P. (2011). Do facial reactions add new dimensions to measuring sensory responses to basic tastes?, Food Quality and Preference, 22 (4), 346-354.
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