Webinar

30-minute talk: Long term rodent studies in neuroscience


In this talk, we will investigate how animal research can be extended in to long-term observations, following the path human research has entered for some time already which resulted in great new insights.  

Attendance of this Noldus Webinar is FREE but limited to 500 attendees, so please sign up as soon as you can. Feel absolutely free to share this invitation with colleagues who may be interested. 

brown mouse on a white gloved hand
 


Date | 29 September 2020

Time | 4pm CEST (Amsterdam) & 4pm EDT (Washington DC)

Duration | 30 minutes

 

 

 


Abstract

Most research has always focused on short-term observations, at least when it comes to detailed investigation. Handling animals a short period of time in a supposedly controlled environment is more feasible than anything else. In any case, it used to be.

The development of medication and the understanding of conditions is reaching further than the mapping of acute symptoms and interactions. Technology is giving us the ability to investigate, collect, and analyze for longer durations. While we seem to understand the short-term very well and are used to experiment in this setting, the long-term asks for trusting technology, which might feel like a dark box for researchers.

In this talk, we will investigate how animal research can be extended in to long-term observations, following the path human research has entered for some time already which resulted in great new insights. By using the right automated tools that even show the most critical researcher exactly what has been going on, short- and long-term research can go hand in hand and translatability can be increased even more.

 


Presenter

Romain Hollands has obtained his Research Master Degree at the University of Maastricht with the specialization Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience in Drug Development and Neurohealth.

With a bachelor background in human neuropsychology, he has always been interested in the translatability of animal to human neuroscientific research. After working with autism models of rodents at Hoffmann la Roche in Basel and working as a teacher at the Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience in Maastricht, he continued his career at Noldus IT as an account manager and scientific consultant. Within this position, he is gaining a lot of insight in to how researchers all around Europe are investigating a specific model, disease, or efficacy of a medicine.

Romain Holland
 


Details

29th September 2020
Virtual meeting